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BADGER CULL

Today 27 August 2013, the badger cull has begun. The farming lobby is behind it, of course, blaming badgers for TB in cattle. But farmers move cattle around the country, and pump them full of antibiotics, so they are more, not less, vulnerable to disease. We shouldn’t be eating beef anyway. Cattle are responsible for high emissions of carbon dioxide, and therefore to global warming. Like overlarge private vehicles, herds of cattle are not good for Earth.

Greed is the cause of the badger cull. The food industry cannot see the point of having badgers. So it wants to kill them. Why not develop a TB vaccine to spray onto peanuts and feed them to badgers instead of killing them? Badgers will travel miles for peanuts. Is that a stupid idea? Killing badgers is wrong, whatever way you look at it.

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Trip to Honiton, Devon.

I am still trying to get money back from Expedia, or Montgomerys Hotel, where I had booked us room for two nights. They emailed to say they were closing down and would refund the money but they haven’t. Now in email conversation with Expedia.

 

In the countryside the rosebay willow herb blooms in clumps on the verges, purple heather on the moors, and ubiquitous buddleia. At the Deer Park Hotel we hear goldfinch chattering. Many huge trees, given space to grow to their proper shape and glory. There’s an ottery, but we only saw insects skimming on the surface of the river.

It was a lovely wedding, though it rained and I fell out of the rather high bed! I was asleep, turned over and found myself on the floor with the contents of the glass-topped bedside table, which fell on me. It took me ages to get back to sleep as I kept laughing hysterically at the silliness of it. no injuries, only a few bruises. It would have been awful to break my hip and have to wait for an ambulance at 5 am.

 Home to a garden full of rats! Gaynor had taken photos of eight of them feeding on and in the bird feeders and on the ground under the feeders. Rat man coming today, Monday. I wish there were some way of keeping them but not near the house. Perhaps a feeding station, like Caroline’s hedgehog café, away from the house. Trouble is, we can’t leave the doors open as they come in and eat Flo’s food. I don’t want to poison them, it’s cruel. I’ll ask the man’s advice. He might have a good suggestion.

Flo was fine while we were away. Woke her carers in the morning, jumping onto the bed, as she does with me, and purring at them.

 She doesn’t sit on her bottom any more. Crouches, rather. It is constipation or rheumatics? Her blood pressure is down, and I have lowered her dose of Amlodipine, as suggested by the vet.

The two week spell of hot weather has more or less broken, and we have heavy showers. Thunder last night.

herring gull nesting

This is our herring  gull  sitting on three eggs – before the fight with other roof gulls – before she lost her eggs.

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herring gull chicks a few days old

herring gull chicks a few days old

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herring gull chicks

herring gull chicks

SPRING WATCH

In her tiny garden in St Ives, my daughter has three hedgehogs, two cats, a herring gull, four goldfish and  a newt! Next door, we have a nesting herring gull, and a so far empty hedgehog house.

Carboot at Roseudgeon today. Long Lane is stunningly beautiful – English countryside at its best. The winding lane is hedged with bluebells, campions, Star of Bethlehem, cow parsley, buttercups and daisies. And now the foxgloves are shooting up. Perfection!